Tag: pain after immunization’

Immunization Reactions and Tips

 - by Dania

There are 2 main different camps on this, those who do and those who don’t!  It seems that both are fanatic in their views and adamant that the other side is wrong.  I personally believe every parent makes the choice they are comfortable with and no one else should judge.  We agonize enough over our decisions and don’t need to be second guessed and criticized at ever step.

Personally, I immunized my kids based on what their Doctor recommends as the required shots.  The point of all this is that after the shots, babies have different reactions and we need to know how to handle them.  For swelling and pain from the injection site I would wrap a bag of frozen peas or corn in a towel and place gently on the affected area for a few minutes at a time to help calm the area down.  Also for fever I would give them Tylenol.  Another tip for crankiness is the Camilia product I use when baby’s teething (see teething baby article for more info on this).

 Here is more detailed info on all this from the About Health Kids site at  http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/healthaz/Immunization-Reactions.aspx?articleID=8658&categoryID=AZ1a which I hope will help, I know how overwhelming it can be especially when it’s your first child!

“Most reactions are common and harmless. The percentage listed next to each reaction shows the percentage of children who have the reaction.

Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP)

  • Pain, tenderness, swelling, or redness at the injection site for 24 to 48 hours (25% to 45%). Giving your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

  • Feverfor 24 to 48 hours (15% to 25%). Give your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) if the fever is over  38.9°C (102°F). The next time your child gets a DTaP shot, start giving acetaminophen in the physician’s office and continue the medicine every 4 to 6 hours for 24 hours.

  • Mild drowsiness (15%), fretfulness (40%), or poor appetite (10% to 15%) for 24 to 48 hours.

  • Painless lump (or nodule) at the injection site 1 or 2 weeks later. The lump is harmless and will disappear in about 2 months. Call your physician within 24 hours if it turns red or is tender.

Call your physician immediately if the following rare but serious reactions occur:

  • Fever over 40.0°C, or 104°F (0.4%)

  • Crying for more than 3 hours (1%)

  • High-pitched, unusual cry (0.1%)

  • Convulsions (very rare)

  • Collapse with shock-like state (very rare)

  • Any other unusual reaction

Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)

These reactions may begin 7 to 10 days after getting vaccine:

  • Fever of 38.3°C to 39.5°C (101°F to 103°F) for 2 or 3 days (10%). Give your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) if the fever is over 38.9°C (102°F). Call your physician within 24 hours if the fever lasts over 72 hours or is over 40°C (104°F).

  • A mild pink rash (measles vaccine rash) mainly on the body (5%). No treatment is necessary. The rash will last 2 to 3 days. Call your physician immediately if the rash changes to purple spots. Call within 24 hours if the rash becomes itchy or the rash lasts more than 3 days.

Polio vaccine (IPV)

  • Sore injection site (rare). No treatment is necessary. Giving your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

  • Fever (1% to 4%). Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen if the fever is over 38.9°C (102°F).

Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7)

  • Fever, usually, mild (10%). Give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen if the fever is over 38.9°C (102°F).

  • Redness, tenderness, or swelling at the shot site (30%). Giving your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

Hemophilus influenza type B vaccine (HIB)

  • Sore injection site (up to 25%) or mild fever (5%). Giving your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

Hepatitis B vaccine (Hep B)

  • Sore injection site (10% to 25%). Giving your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

  • Fever (up to 7%). Give your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) if the fever is over 38.9°C (102°F).

Chickenpox vaccine (VAR)

  • Never give your child aspirin for any symptom within 6 weeks of receiving the vaccine. (Reye’s syndrome has been linked with the use of aspirin to treat fever or pain caused by a virus). For fever or pain, give ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

  • The chickenpox vaccine may cause pain or swelling at the injection site for 1 to 2 days (20%).

  • Some children (15%) may have a fever that begins 2 to 4 weeks after the vaccination and lasts 1 to 3 days. Give your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) if the fever is over 38.9°C (102°F).

  • A few children (3%) develop a mild rash at the injection site or elsewhere on the body. The rash begins 5 to 26 days after the vaccine, looks like a few (2 to 10) chickenpox sores, and usually lasts a few days.

Children with these rashes can go to day care or school. If the vaccine rash contains fluid, cover it with clothing or a Band-Aid. Avoid school if there are widespread, weepy sores (because this may be real chickenpox).

Hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccine

  • Sore injection shot site (20% to 50%). Giving your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

  • Headache or fatigue (less than 10%).

Influenza virus vaccine

  • Pain, tenderness, or swelling at the injection site within 6 to 8 hours (10%). Giving your child ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol) and placing a cold, wet washcloth over the tender area may provide some relief.

  • Fever of 38.3°C to 39.5°C or 101°F to 103°F (18%). Fevers mainly occur in young children. Give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) for fever over 38.9°C (102°F).

Most reactions to vaccines are common and harmless. Severe allergic (anaphylactic) reactions to any vaccine are possible, but they are extremely rare or have never been reported. Listed below are the symptoms for a severe allergic reaction as well as common reactions to specific vaccines.

What should you do if your child has a severe allergic reaction?

Call 911 immediately if you notice the following severe allergic reactions:

  • difficulty breathing

  • weakness

  • wheezing

  • fast heartbeat

  • hives

  • dizziness

  • paleness

  • swelling of the throat”

Good Luck!

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